Security, Conflict & Justice

Abi Dymond

Security, Conflict & Justice

PhD Researcher in Security, Conflict & Justice (ESRC +3)
College of Social Sciences & International Studies, University of Exeter

Start Date: April 2013

Research Topic: Tasers and less leathal weapons in the UK

My inter-disciplinary PhD research, draws on elements from criminology, sociology and law, uses quantitative and qualitative techniques, from binary logistic regression to actor-network theory, to examine the controversies around Tasers and less lethal weapons in the UK. 

Research supervisors: Professor Brian Rappert, Professor Rachel Murray

E-mail: ad426@exeter.ac.uk

Twitter: @abidymond

Website: https://eprofile.exeter.ac.uk/abigaildymond/?section=2

Fran Johnson

Security, Conflict & Justice

PhD Researcher in Security, Conflict & Justice (ESRC 1+3)
Deaprtment of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2014

Research Topic: Narratives of Belonging Amongst Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children in the UK

My research relates to child asylum-seekers based in the UK without parent or guardian. Informed by the "new" sociology of childhood, I conduct research with children, understanding children as active in the construction and contestation of their own lives and of society. I explore critically concepts of agency, vulnerability, resilience and belonging within an asylum regime which is punitive and discriminatory. I am currently investigating participatory and creative research methods in the qualitative tradition.

Research supervisors: Dr Jason Hart, Dr Debbie Watson

E-mail: f.m.johnson@bath.ac.uk

Twitter: @francesmary1980

Rebecca Mavin

Security, Conflict & Justice

PhD Researcher in Security, Conflict & Justice (ESRC 1+3)
College of Social Sciences & International Studies, University of Exeter

Start Date: September 2014

Research Topic: The Body and Embodied Experiences in the U.K. Asylum System

My research examines the everyday embodied experiences of asylum seekers in the U.K, with the aim of exploring the roles and functions of the body within the system. Through fieldwork conducted in the South West of England and analyses of asylum policy, I hope to discuss the various ways that the body is implicated in the asylum system, and the impacts that the system’s governance of the body has on asylum seekers’ everyday lives and self-understandings.

Research supervisors: Dr Andrew Schaap, Dr Katharine Charsley

E-mail: rm480@exeter.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Rebecca Mavin

Twitter: @becca_mavin

Stuart Scrase

Security, Conflict & Justice

PhD Researcher in Security, Conflict & Justice (ESRC 1+3)
College of Social Sciences & International Studies, University of Exeter

Start Date: September 2012

Research Topic: Violence against the police in the 2011 English Riots

Through ethnographic research in north London and a situational analysis of video footage of the riots, I aim to explain the occurrences of violence against police in 2011. The research responds to causal simplifications by the media/politicians which posit individual pathology rather than systemic dysfunction; a relative lack of in depth qualitative study of the social conditions and experiences which shaped the subjectivity to riot; and to a theory of violence, which proposes analysing the situational dynamics but also excludes background/social factors as causally irrelevant. 

Research supervisors: Dr Katherine Tyler, Dr Will Atkinson

E-mail: sts203@exeter.ac.uk

Hen Wilkinson

Security, Conflict & Justice

PhD Researcher in Security, Conflict & Justice (ESRC 1+3)
SPAIS, University of Bristol

Start Date: September 2013

Research Topic: Building a sustainable core for community-facing collaborations: how everyday conflicts are surfaced and managed in cross-sector working

My research is looking at the dynamics of cross-sector collaboration in two case study networks - one in the UK (Bristol), the other in the Netherlands (Amsterdam). It is using participative and complexity-informed research methodologies to explore the values and power relations underpinning community-facing initiatives across a collaborative network. Central to the study is an exploration of how tensions and conflicts within the network are surfaced and managed, with what implications for sustained collaboration and the quality of service delivery. As public governance is increasingly devolved to the local level, the quality and inclusivity of cross-sector collaborative frameworks becomes highly relevant for core infrastructure and community support programmes.

Research supervisors: Dr David Sweeting, Dr Deborah Osburg

Professional memberships / Positions held: Director, Community Resolve (communityresolve.com); Associate, Taos Institute; Visiting Fellow, Centre for Understanding Social Practice, University of West of England

E-mail: hen.wilkinson@bristol.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Hen Wilkinson

Twitter: Communityresolv

Website: www.communityresolve.com