Health & Wellbeing

Carys Banks

Health & Wellbeing

PhD Researcher in Health & Wellbeing (ESRC 1+3)
Department for Health, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2011

Research Topic: The vulnerable empowered? An ethnographic exploration of the tensions between policy imperatives in the context of learning disability social care support

Through my doctoral research I have been ethnographically exploring how government policy is interpreted and incorporated into social care support for adults with learning disabilities in the UK. I have been particularly interested in looking at policies focused on empowering people with civil and economic rights and responsibilities over their lives. Influenced by liberal values, which position individuals as autonomous, self-sufficient agents, I am interested in exploring how these 'sit' in relation to the fact that people with learning disabilities have cognitive impairments and so are, in varying ways, reliant on others for support with aspects of their lives.

Research supervisors: Dr David Wainwright, Dr Rachael Gooberman-Hill

Professional memberships / Positions held: SWDTC TOR member, Student representative REACH (Research Ethics Approval Committee for Health), Athena SWAN Committee, University of Bath, Department for Health. I am the post-graduate student representative for the Department’s application for an Athena SWAN Bronze award.  2012-2016: Conference Committee Organiser/helper for Organiser, various

E-mail: cab45@bath.ac.uk

Website: https://bath.academia.edu/CarysBanks

Harriet Carroll

Health & Wellbeing

PhD Researcher in Health & Wellbeing (ESRC 1+3)
Department for Health, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: Factors affecting blood sugar control and appetite regulation

My PhD is focused on how hydration and breakfast influence blood sugar control and appetite. The first trial involves testing the acute glycaemic and appetite response after being dehydrated versus rehydrated. Studies 2 and 3 involve analysing data in order to find trends in what people eat at breakfast, how it corresponds to what they eat later in the day and certain health outcomes. The final intervention aims to investigate whether sweet food at breakfast changes what people eat later in the day, as well as whether this is metabolically a better time of day to be eating sweet. 

Research supervisors: Dr James Betts, Dr Laura Johnson, Professor Dylan Thompson, Dr Lewis James

E-mail: hac38@bath.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Harriet Carroll

Twitter: @angryhacademic

Lewis Elliott

Health & Wellbeing

PhD Researcher in Health and Wellbeing (ESRC +3)
College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

Start date: September 2012

Research topic: Physical activity in natural environments: Importance of environmental quality, landscape type and promotional materials.

Natural environments support health-enhancing physical activity which confers additive health benefits over physical activity in other environments. In my thesis, an experiment investigated psychophysiological responses to exercising in different environments. Secondary data analysis explored the volume of physical activity conducted in different natural environments. Quantitative content analysis examined how brochures promote walking in natural environments. An online survey revealed how modifying such brochures can heighten intentions to walk in natural environments. The thesis demonstrated that protection of natural environments is vital for preserving recreational experiences and could contribute to population-level increases in physical activity with improved promotion in the future.

Research supervisors: Dr Matthew White, Professor Adrian Taylor

E-mail: L.R.Elliott@exeter.ac.uk

Twitter:  @lewiselliott90

Website: http://www.ecehh.org/people/lewis-elliott/

Caitlin Lloyd

Health & Wellbeing

PhD Researcher in Health & Wellbeing (ESRC 1+3)
School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: Do Anorexia Nervosa and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Share a Neurobiological Pathology?

My research is concerned with investigating the parallels in cognitive function between Anorexia Nervosa and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and whether any commonality can be explained by a shared neural abnormality. It is hoped this will inform aetiological models of Anorexia Nervosa leading to the development of new, and more effective, treatments.

Research supervisors: Dr Anne Haase, Dr Bas Verplanken

E-mail: 

Robert Mann

Health & Wellbeing

PhD Researcher in Health & Wellbeing (ESRC 1+3)
Children’s Health & Exercise Research Centre, Sport & Health Sciences , University of Exeter

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: Child and adolescent specialisation within the sport of Athletics, with a specific focus upon endurance running. 

Child and adolescent participation in the sport of endurance running has become increasingly popular within England. However, whilst this increase in participation is encouraging for the National Governing Body, England Athletics, it is coupled with poor levels of athlete retention following maturation. As a result, my PhD research will aim to investigate the possible factors contributing towards this observed phenomenon, whilst attempting to provide England Athletics with practical interventions to improve their levels of youth athlete retention. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, it is the intention of this PhD research to focus on the prevention of overtraining syndrome; effectively monitoring training-load, and improving our psychosocial understanding of what contributes towards ‘dropout’ from Athletics. 

Research supervisors: Professor Craig Williams, Dr Alan Barker, Professor Simone Fullagar

Professional memberships/positions held: British Association of Sport and Exercise Science Member, Organising Committee Member SWDTC Student Conference 2016, Student Staff Liaison Committee Subject Chair: Sport and Health Sciences, 2015/16

E-mail: rm537@exeter.ac.uk

Twitter: @Running_Mann_92 / @CHERC_UoE

Siobhan Mitchell

Health & Wellbeing

PhD Researcher in Health and Wellbeing (ESRC +3)
Department of Health, University of Bath

Start date: September 2014

Research topic: Implications of maturation timing on the psychological wellbeing of elite dancers

Current research suggests that maturation timing (whether an individual biologically matures in advance of their peers, later than their peers or at an average time) may be an important factor in how individuals cope with different learning experiences and social contexts and can therefore play a role in subsequent psychological wellbeing. My PhD research aims to explore this within the context of elite dance training and to investigate how we might use this knowledge within dance teaching contexts to promote and to optimise psychological wellbeing in adolescent dancers.

Research supervisors: Dr Sean Cumming, Dr Anne Haase

Professional memberships / Positions held: International Association of Dance Medicine and Science Member, One Dance UK Member, SWDTC Student Representative, Organising Committee Member SWDTC Student Conference 2015, Council Member of the South West Research Cooperative, International Association of Dance Medicine and Science Student Committee Member

E-mail: S.B.Mitchell@bath.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Siobhan Mitchell

Twitter: @Siobhan_Dance