Global Political Economy

Richard Baxter

Global Political Economy

PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: How best to evaluate the success of pro-poor interventions in agriculture in low-income countries (e.g. by an NGO)

I research whether it is possible to combine quantitative and qualitative research to evaluate the success of pro-poor interventions in agriculture in low-income countries.  This research is undertaken alongside James Copestake at the University of Bath who has developed the QUIP methodology which has been successfully trialled in Ethiopia and Malawi.

Research supervisors: Professor James Copestake, Professor Jeffrey Henderson

E-mail: rb863@bath.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Richard Baxter

Molly Bond

Global Political Economy

PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
School of Geograhical Sciences, University of Bristol

Start Date: September 2014

Research Topic: STS; Development Studies; Political Ecology/Economy; Synthetic Biology, Multi-sited Ethnography

My interdisciplinary research bridges Science and Technology Studies (STS) and Global Development Studies. Within the policy context of a ‘green’ transition to a global ‘Bioeconomy’, I am examining the implications of commercial synthetic biology to sustainable development and future agricultural-industrial production. I am particularly interested in the concepts of ‘disruptive’, ‘sustainable’ and ‘responsible’ innovation, as well as how these notions are assimilated into multi-stakeholder deliberations and the global governance of emerging technologies. Methodologically I am applying multi-sited ethnography, discourse analysis and global production network/global value web analyses.

Research supervisors: Dr Maria Fanin, Dr Adrian Flint, Dr Roy Maconachie

Professional menberships/Positions held: Cabot Institute, FSSL International Development Research Group, Global Political Economy Research Group, Development Studies Association

E-mail: Molly.Bond@bristol.ac.uk

Website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/geography/people/molly-rose-r-bond/overview.html

Kyle Geraghty

Global Political Economy

PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: The complex structure of capitalist crisis in China

I focus on the complexities of understanding how developing non-European capitalist powers enter economic crisis, utilising China as my central case study. Highlighting its unique scale and status among the rising non-European states. 

The research relies on global political economy, economic history, and economic geography to draw out the specific endogenous and exogenous differences that define how capitalism emerged in these states, and judge this evidence against the apparent universal laws of capitalism as a global system.

Research supervisors: Dr Gregory Schwartz, Dr Phil Tomlinson

E-mail: kyle.geraghty@bristol.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Kyle Geraghty

Twitter: @theoryashistory

Website/blog: https://theoryashistory.wordpress.com/ 

https://bristol.academia.edu/KyleGeraghty

Lydia Medland

Global Political Economy

PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
SPAIS, University of Bristol

Start Date: September 2013

Research Topic: Global Political Economy of Food and Seasonal Production (Case study, Morocco)

My research is focused on seasonal workers and their experiences of global food production, specifically in Morocco. I am researching the social and working conditions of seasonal workers and their livelihood strategies whilst producing crops such as tomatoes in counter-seasonal rhythms destined for Europe. In the context of changing social and political conditions in Europe and Northern Africa I am interested to understand how the political economy of food is interpreted in local contexts, particularly by workers. Methodologically, my approach is interpretive and will involve in-depth interviews and visual methods. For this research I am learning French and Moroccan Arabic. 

Research supervisors: Professor Tonia Novitz, Dr Emma Carmel, Dr Adrian Flint

Positions held: Co-coordinator of Bristol Participatory Action Research Group, SPAIS Student Rep

E-mail: Lydia.Medland@bristol.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Lydia Medland

Twitter: @Lydyact

Harry Pitts

Global Political Economy

PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
Department of Social and Policy Sciences, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2011

Research Topic: Marxian Value Theory and the ‘Crisis of Measurability’: A Case Study of Work in the Creative Industries in the UK and Netherlands.

I am interested in critical approaches to the changing world of work. I place special focus upon challenges and struggles around the measurement and valuation of labour. I look closely at the creative industries as an arena for wider changes, interrogating the relevancy of Marxian analyses in understanding these shifts. I conduct fieldwork and interviews with creative professionals in the UK and the Netherlands to explore the topic.  My research provokes questions around the future of work, alternatives to the traditional relationship with labour, work-life balance, the quality and quantity of work, and different notions of how work is valued

Research supervisors: Dr Ana Dinerstein, Professor Jeff Henderson

Professional memberships / positions held: Foundation for European Progressive Studies Young Academics Network (Basic Income Working Group)

E-mail: f.h.pitts@bath.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Harry Pitts

Twitter: @fhpitts

Website / blog: http://bath.academia.edu/FrederickHPitts http://themachineintheghost.blogspot.co.uk

Nicky Stubbs

Global Political Economy

PhD Researcher in Global Political Economy (ESRC 1+3)
Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: The transformation of work and the crisis of social democracy

I am interested in the process of de-industrialisation and the impact that it has on the everyday experience of work – particularly its transformative effect on labour subjectivity. This impacts the way people see themselves in an increasingly fragmented and divided labour market. I am particularly interested in the crisis of the left in this context and what the left is doing to reorganise an increasingly precariatised workforce against the reproduction of capitalist social relations. My research is inspired by my previous employment as a researcher for the National Union of Mineworkers and for a Labour Party shadow cabinet minister. 

Research supervisors: Dr Ana Dinerstein, Professor Jeffrey Henderson

E-mail: N.Stubbs@bath.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Nicky Stubbs

Twitter: Nicky Stubbs