Education

Tony Clark

Education

PhD Researcher in Education (ESRC 1+3)
Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol

Start Date: September 2014

Research Topic: Intensive IELTS Preparation in China and Japan

The thesis ‘Intensive IELTS Writing Preparation in China and Japan’ was given a British Council Research Assessment Award in 2014. In 2015/16 he was a recipient of the Newton Fund Scholarship - a competitive grant to promote researcher mobility and encourage British-Chinese academic relations - as well as funding to support different sections of upcoming overseas research trips from the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) and the ESRC. In 2016 Tony will spend two months at the British Council in Tokyo, and a subsequent six months working at Zhejiang University under the guidance of Professor Lianzhen He, Dean of International Studies. 

Research supervisors: Dr Guoxing Yu, Dr Talia Isaacs

Professional memberships: ALTE, EALTA

E-mail: tc9734@bristol.ac.uk

Rebecca Clarkson

Education

PhD Researcher in Education (ESRC 1+3)
Graduate School of Education, University of Exeter

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: Assessment of writing

Given the changed policy context in England for the assessment of writing over the past five years, and the high-stakes assessment context in which it occurs, I want to investigate the validity and reliability of the current assessment of writing at the end of KS2. Currently, this combines an external test of grammar and teacher assessment of writing. Key theoretical thinking from assessment research will be used to consider writing assessment. The research will be routed in a sociocultural perspective of writing. 

The main research question would be: Is the combination of a grammar test and teacher assessment at the end of Key Stage 2 a valid and reliable assessment of writing?

Research supervisors: Professor Debra Myhill, Dr Susan Jones

E-mail: rc474@exeter.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Rebecca Clarkson 

Katherine Evans

Education

PhD Researcher in Education (ESRC+3)
School of Education, University of Exeter

My research is focussed on contesting and reconceptualising dominant discourses of ‘readiness’ in the context of early childhood education.  In particular, my work is engaged with a post-structurally informed critique of current ideas and practices concerning notions of ‘readiness-for-school’ and ‘readiness-for-learning’ that have dominated developments in policy and pedagogy in England in recent years.  I am also interested in the development of creative research methodologies that explore the potential of deconstructing the theory/practice binary that can often dominate within conventional approaches to educational research.

Professional memberships/Positions held: SWDTC Student Representative

E-mail: khle201@exeter.ac.uk

Twitter: @kat_evans201

Dan Northover

Education

PhD Researcher in Education (ESRC 1+3)
Graduate School of Education, University of Exeter

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: Progression in Learning Skills: Developing a formative assessment framework to track, support and inform planning for the progression of Learning Skills in primary education

My research will primarily seek to create a formative assessment framework for tracking the progress of ‘Learning Skills’ (a term used in a number of schools and LAs to describe the skills or dispositions necessary for learning to learn, developing positive learning dispositions, metacognition and self-regulated learning) across primary school. This will take the form of a practical, teacher-friendly formative assessment framework that can be used by teachers and children to assess development in Learning Skills, in order to support children to make sustained and informed progress throughout their primary years.

Research supervisors: Dr Shirley Larkin

E-mail: dn271@exeter.ac.uk

Twitter: @dan_northover

Samantha Stone

Education

PhD Researcher in Education (ESRC 1+3)
Department of Education, University of Bath

Start Date: September 2015

Research Topic: Ethnographic research into school mealtimes to understand processes of socialisation

Much of school mealtime policy and research has been shaped and continues to be shaped by the promotion of nutrition and health.  However, this does not capture the social significance of school mealtimes or the role it plays in children’s socialisation processes.  My research takes an ethnographic approach to explore school mealtimes as important cultural sites that socialise children into mealtime comportment, commensality, communicative expectations, sociality, morality and understandings of diverse and complex relationships.  Its considers how school mealtimes are replete with social messages of appropriate ways to think, act and feel in the world, recognising the multiplicity of the avenues through which children get to know the social world and their place within it.

Research supervisors: Dr Michael Donnelly, Professor Steve Gough

E-mail: sls27@bath.ac.uk

LinkedIn: Sam Stone

Twitter: @Sam_L_Stone